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Telegraph.co.uk£89 for unwanted softwareTelegraph.co.ukI have a John Lewis & Waitrose Partnership card with which I make most of my credit card purchases. Four months ago I was debited with £89 with a merchant reference I did not recognise. I queried this with the card provider and the £89 was refunded ...and more »
This is MoneyFUND FOCUS: Law Debenture is a law unto itself – the global trust with a split personalityThis is MoneyBy Personal Finance Reporter For The Mail On Sunday ... Now, the corporate services arm's activities range from acting as independent trustees for company pension schemes through to offering a whistleblowing facility for employees if they are aware of ...
This is MoneyJEFF PRESTRIDGE: How six workers who lost their jobs after their employers went bust stopped a pensions abyssThis is MoneyOn Wednesday, while the heat was intensifying on Sir Philip Green to plug the gaping hole (a £571 million hole) in the BHS pension scheme, six middle-aged gentlemen were quietly allowed into the armed courtyard of 10 Downing Street. Their mission, to ...MPs invite Sir Philip Green to answer questions over BHS collapsePoliticsHome.comBHS - The 'Dead Store Walking' That Never Really Had a ChanceHuffington Post UKall 40 news articles »
Telegraph.co.ukNegative rates are bad for everyone - just ask Sir Philip GreenTelegraph.co.ukTo many of us, it's been obvious for a long time now that ultra-low interest rates are doing more harm than good, driving up house prices and mortgage debt for no particular benefit to consumption and business investment. Quite the reverse, in ...JON REES: What was Sir Philip Green thinking and why did we not learn when Comet went bust after being sold for £1?This is Moneyall 36 news articles »
The GuardianPoll boost for Remain campaignThe GuardianWith less than two months before the in/out referendum, the latest Opinium/Observer poll shows 38% of voters believe the UK economy would fare better inside the EU, against 29% who think it would do better if the UK voted to leave. The online poll ...and more »
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Getting financial advice

It’s time to review your finances and make sure your money is working as hard for you as it possibly can. Somewhere out there are the right financial products for you but unless you have the mind of a forensic detective and understand the complexities of everything from insurance and pensions to hedge funds and derivatives get sound financial advice.

If you don’t already have someone in mind as an adviser one of the best ways to find someone good is to ask family, friends or colleagues for recommendations. You want someone who’s independent so that he or she can give you impartial advice about the whole range of products on offer. If you choose an adviser who isn’t independent they can only advise you on the products they work with. Some advisers specialise; if you want advice on pensions you might want and adviser who is a pensions specialist. Ask about the qualifications of anyone you are thinking of seeing.

The other question you have to ask is about how you pay for the service. You may choose an adviser to whom you pay fees upfront. Fees vary hugely so find out before you book your appointment. Try haggling to get the fees reduced if possible and ask for the first session to be free so that you get the chance to decide whether or not you have a rapport. The other option is an adviser who gets his or her fees through commission which you ultimately pay for because it’s added to the cost of the product you buy. Or you may pay for advice through a combination of the two.

Whoever you choose it’s helpful if you can build a lasting and trusting relationship which will make you both money for years to come. Remember that a financial plan made now needs to be reviewed frequently. What’s right for you in the current climate may not be right once the economy picks up again or if your circumstances change. The degree of risk you’re prepared to take with your savings and investments may be different when you’re single from when you’ve got a partner and children. Getting the right adviser is just the start of the process. 

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