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Telegraph.co.ukMoney, holidays and shopping - what will Brexit mean for you?Telegraph.co.ukIt said on its website: “We have temporarily suspended our travel money website following unprecedented customer demand for foreign currency overnight and this morning. We apologise to all ... Ditto, Europeans living and working in the UK. ... What ...Four ways Brexit will hit personal financesThe Independentall 77 news articles »
Babble (blog)EU referendum: Battle to be Brexit Prime Minister heats up as Tory MPs question Boris Johnson's leadership credentialsTelegraph.co.ukAs the flags of European nations lead the annual Pride parade in London the referendum result is hot on everyone's lips. Thousands of people are taking part in this year's event, a day after the UK's vote to leave the the EU was announced. Some of ...What Brexit Means for My Family Living in the U.K.Babble (blog)How Brexit could affect your investments and pensionThe Week UKall 11,743 news articles »
Telegraph.co.ukEU referendum: What should I do about holiday money now?Telegraph.co.uk... fell dramatically as the referendum outcome emerged yesterday. At one point it hit $1.32, a fall of almost 12pc – its lowest level since 1985 Credit: alamy ... Mr Lewis said: “Personally, I'd use one of the cheap overseas cards – the Halifax ...and more »
The IndependentFour ways Brexit will hit personal financesThe IndependentUncertainty while markets adjust and firms decide how to respond means the UK stock market is likely to be volatile for some time. Anyone who has recently retired and opted to take an income using drawdown (periodic cashing in of a pension fund still ...and more »
BBC NewsEU referendum: The changing political landscape of WalesBBC NewsI don't think this was a huge shock in many respects as we've seen the disparity in 'remain' and 'leave' between the nations of the UK for quite some time now. ... Equally I think the money from Europe has been better spent in NI than it has in Wales ...and more »
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Getting financial advice

It’s time to review your finances and make sure your money is working as hard for you as it possibly can. Somewhere out there are the right financial products for you but unless you have the mind of a forensic detective and understand the complexities of everything from insurance and pensions to hedge funds and derivatives get sound financial advice.

If you don’t already have someone in mind as an adviser one of the best ways to find someone good is to ask family, friends or colleagues for recommendations. You want someone who’s independent so that he or she can give you impartial advice about the whole range of products on offer. If you choose an adviser who isn’t independent they can only advise you on the products they work with. Some advisers specialise; if you want advice on pensions you might want and adviser who is a pensions specialist. Ask about the qualifications of anyone you are thinking of seeing.

The other question you have to ask is about how you pay for the service. You may choose an adviser to whom you pay fees upfront. Fees vary hugely so find out before you book your appointment. Try haggling to get the fees reduced if possible and ask for the first session to be free so that you get the chance to decide whether or not you have a rapport. The other option is an adviser who gets his or her fees through commission which you ultimately pay for because it’s added to the cost of the product you buy. Or you may pay for advice through a combination of the two.

Whoever you choose it’s helpful if you can build a lasting and trusting relationship which will make you both money for years to come. Remember that a financial plan made now needs to be reviewed frequently. What’s right for you in the current climate may not be right once the economy picks up again or if your circumstances change. The degree of risk you’re prepared to take with your savings and investments may be different when you’re single from when you’ve got a partner and children. Getting the right adviser is just the start of the process. 

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