The material on this website is for information only
and is not intended as any recommendation or endorsement of any products or companies mentioned. We are not licensed by the FSA to give financial advice, and none of the material on this website constitutes or is intended to constitute financial ...
News
Jonathan Ganesh: 'I kept saying please save me, please help me. Please God'Belfast TelegraphWhat happened at Docklands made it a lot more personal for me. ... We give what money we can to help others. ... There are IRA victims with American passports who were compensated with millions of pounds from Colonel Gaddafi, who helped the IRA kill ...and more »
This is MoneyThe real cost of buying a home: the essential guide to help first-time buyers get aheadThis is MoneyThis is Money is here to help you prepare for the full cost of the home buying process with this simple checklist for first-time buyers. It covers the obvious costs you'll quickly stumble across but it ... If you had a mortgage offering this rate on ...
Data errors could see 4 million retirees paid wrong pensionCitywire.co.ukAnother problem is that since 2012 the government no longer required pension providers to collect data on contracting-out, which, the paper said, means that six million people who transferred into a personal pension have no records. The Royal Mail ...and more »
Citywire.co.ukAltmann hits out at 'hateful' state pension campaign bullyingCitywire.co.ukPensions minister Ros Altmann has accused the Women Against State Pension Inequality (Waspi) campaign of bullying her. The Waspi campaign was set up in April last year in a bid to oppose the government's programme of state pension age equalisation, ...and more »
The GuardianHuge rise in hack attacks as cyber-criminals target small businessesThe Guardian“SMEs have not historically been the target of cybercrime but in 2015 something drastically changed,” says Toni Allen, UK head of client propositions at the British Standards Institute (BSI). “The latest Government Security ... “We have seen some high ...and more »
Have you met...
Latest Members:


RinjaniHalomi


doaanile7


donjuancuk


jakibadr


Sloane Beck


jappleseed


LynneW72

 

Model Thinking: The Economic Benefits of Eco Fashion

After speaking to many of the 28 Eco Designers at London Fashion Week, I felt the 'Slow Fashion' movement could benefit from publicity as money saving for individuals - buying fewer clothes, perhaps at slightly higher prices, that last much longer and therefore save people money in the long term.

Many of the 28 Eco Designers within the Estethica Exhibition at London Fashion Week mentioned the term ‘slow fashion’ during our impromptu interviews. The slow fashion movement aims to slow down the fast turnover of clothing in the retail industry, reducing clothing waste to landfill, and moving towards eco friendly clothing that lasts more than one or two fashion seasons. Men’s suits are a good example of slow fashion; you can wear the same smart jacket 15 times and remain fashionable, as long as you wash it occasionally.

catwalk_model_100.gifIf there’s one thing I’ve learned from my experience in the environmental sector, it is to never forget the accepted and astonishingly simple model of sustainability. That model is portrayed by 3 interlinking ‘Olympic’ circles of sustainability: Environmental, Economic and Social. The central area where these 3 circles interlink is where true sustainability occurs. I’m yet to find an example where this model of thinking is not helpful.

I’d say the Eco Designers are all pretty sorted on the Environmental circle. Their eco clothing features organic cotton, recycled and up-cycled materials, pesticides free, etc. On the Social circle, a few of them quite rightly said the phrase ‘Fashion First’ – there’s no point being eco if no one wants to buy their clothes to look good for social occasions.

But what about the Economic circle? While some of the designers highlighted that slow fashion can save consumers money in the long term, my feeling was that this was not emphasised enough in their advertising strategies. Perhaps it’s the very labels eco, ethical or sustainable fashion themselves. These terms appeal to an altruistic sensibility that may make existing consumers feel good about wearing their clothes, but not necessarily reach new audiences concerned with economic self preservation during a recession.

If PR based on eco, ethical or sustainable fashion is preaching to the converted, how do they reach new customers?

As an environmentalist I’ve learnt to emphasise the economic and social benefits more than the environmental. Try emphasising your clothes as durable in your advertising, saving people money because they won’t need to buy new ones next year. If you make full use of all waste materials, try advertising this as efficiency and a means of keeping your costs low. If your materials are sourced within the UK, that’s a benefit primarily to the consumer who doesn’t have to ultimately foot the bill for the ‘fashion miles’ of flying materials around the world; the secondary benefit is reduced climate change.

Some of the designers were already using this model in their PR. I hope more Eco Designers benefit from this model of thinking. 

Atul Srivastava
Eco Expert
www.ecoexpert.tv
Follow me each day on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ecoexperttv

Advertise with us  |  Privacy  |  Terms & Copyright                                                                                     Website maintained by USP Networks