The material on this website is for information only
and is not intended as any recommendation or endorsement of any products or companies mentioned. We are not licensed by the FSA to give financial advice, and none of the material on this website constitutes or is intended to constitute financial ...
News
As two of the common cancers affecting men and women – Prostate and Ovarian cancer - are the focus of March awareness campaigns, AIG outlines how its unique Cancer Cover insurance policies provide vital financial and emotional help when it is needed most.  
Chartis Direct has launched a new Heart Attack and Stroke insurance policy, which gives cash payouts on diagnosis of either a heart attack or stroke.  There is a choice of cover level, giving £15,000, £25,000 or £50,000 on diagnosis.
A new survey has revealed that £454.60 is the average amount of money that people would lend to a friend suffering from a long term illness such as cancer. This equates to just less than a week’s extra pay, based on average gross weekly earnings of £458*.
A leading debt management company is reporting a rise in the numbers of its customers who cite loss of sleep as a direct result of debt anxiety as a major catalyst for contacting the company for help.
Annual average household expenditure is estimated to be £35,978. The corresponding figure for a household where the main occupant is 65 – 74 is £23,711 and £15,139 where they are aged 75 and over
Have you met...
Latest Members:


Dorset Mum


hlgarner


Fiogob


Debs


Lorraine


Casperbrown


DianeCS

 

Getting financial advice

It’s time to review your finances and make sure your money is working as hard for you as it possibly can. Somewhere out there are the right financial products for you but unless you have the mind of a forensic detective and understand the complexities of everything from insurance and pensions to hedge funds and derivatives get sound financial advice.

If you don’t already have someone in mind as an adviser one of the best ways to find someone good is to ask family, friends or colleagues for recommendations. You want someone who’s independent so that he or she can give you impartial advice about the whole range of products on offer. If you choose an adviser who isn’t independent they can only advise you on the products they work with. Some advisers specialise; if you want advice on pensions you might want and adviser who is a pensions specialist. Ask about the qualifications of anyone you are thinking of seeing.

The other question you have to ask is about how you pay for the service. You may choose an adviser to whom you pay fees upfront. Fees vary hugely so find out before you book your appointment. Try haggling to get the fees reduced if possible and ask for the first session to be free so that you get the chance to decide whether or not you have a rapport. The other option is an adviser who gets his or her fees through commission which you ultimately pay for because it’s added to the cost of the product you buy. Or you may pay for advice through a combination of the two.

Whoever you choose it’s helpful if you can build a lasting and trusting relationship which will make you both money for years to come. Remember that a financial plan made now needs to be reviewed frequently. What’s right for you in the current climate may not be right once the economy picks up again or if your circumstances change. The degree of risk you’re prepared to take with your savings and investments may be different when you’re single from when you’ve got a partner and children. Getting the right adviser is just the start of the process. 

Advertise with us  |  Privacy  |  Terms & Copyright                                                                                     Website maintained by USP Networks